Q&A: Rebecca Schinsky of BookRiot and Bookrageous

Drunk Austen

If you’re not already familiar with our Q&A series, it’s basically where we find really, really interesting people, and ask them all the questions we would ask said cool person. We try to ask all the things we’d ask if we got to kidnap them and take them to a coffee shop, and had their attention all to ourselves for about 30 minutes before the police busted in. But since that is a crazy, crazy thing that we’ve absolutely never had any desire to do, we just send them an email and ask politely. 

This week in coffee shop kidnappings our ongoing Q&A series, we’ve managed to steal a few precious seconds of Rebecca Schinsky’s time. She’s the director of content and community for Riot New Media, and works on one of our favorite literary sites, Book Riot. If that weren’t enough, she’s also one of our favorite people on Twitter…

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The Top 40 Albums of 2014 (20-1)

Bob Dylan Wrote Propaganda Songs

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A few days ago I posted the first 20 in my “Top 40 Albums of 2014” list (check it out here). Below you will find this year’s edition of what I consider the top 20 albums of the year. You’ll find albums from varying genres and possibly a few albums that are new to you. I think it’s important to note what I define as a top caliber album. Great songs are always a plus, but more important to me is the ability of an artist to create a series of songs that tell a story, that convey an overall theme, that complement each other, and that make the listener think differently about the human experience. We are moving into an age where most consumers are more concerned with hit songs, which is why I feel compelled to highlight those musicians that have stayed honest to the age-old art…

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On Value and Being Seen

Paper Pencil Life

Tara Brach

Longtime reader Sarah asked in the comments on my post about Edith Pearlman if I could share my thoughts on how I skate the inevitable line of doing work for work sake and doing work to be seen.  To which I say:

Oh boy–how much time do you have?

Every artist I know struggles with this dynamic–don’t you?  Isn’t this at the very core of wanting a life in the arts?  You have something to say and don’t you want someone to hear it/see it?  This seems like a very simple idea, though we know it is not.  The minute someone DOES hear/see/notice your work is when things get really FUNKY.  

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